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Your parents want to teach you to appreciate boring touristy sightseeing things that you'll enjoy way less than continuing to be at home playing video games. You want to do cool fun kid things (like maybe playing different video games than the ones you have at home). Your siblings want to annoy you literally to death in the backseat of the car. No one gets what they want. But at least you get to write an essay about it when you get back to school.



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It was super nice of your friend to invite you to their family's Thanksgiving, and they're all very welcoming, but everything's just a little...off. The stuffing isn't the same as your mom's, and they all go for a hike after the meal instead of watching TV, which is weird. You'll probably end up more homesick than you would've been if you'd stayed in the dorms. You WILL get really good at nodding and smiling when your friend's racist grandma starts talking about affirmative action, though. So that's something.



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In movies and your friends' crazy anecdotes, road trips seem like the most fun pastime imaginable. Snacks! Tunes! Mysterious hicks who might try to kill you in a this-will-be-hilarious-later way! But those movies all conveniently leave out the fact that the primary activity of a road trip is SITTING IN A CAR FOR HOURS. Yep. You may not discover America, but you will discover how much you hate your friends. And how bad they smell after a week without a shower.



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Doesn't matter if it's a ski trip, a beach trip, or a camping trip, or if it's with work acquaintances, classmates, or church group. These trips are all the same: There will be a puzzle. The person you're romantically interested in will end up not going at the last minute. Two semi-unlikely people will couple up and everyone else will spend the whole trip raising their eyebrows at each other about it. You'll all triumphantly finish the puzzle with just enough time left in the trip to start a new puzzle, but no one will really be as into the second puzzle because it's clearly not going to get finished. Then you'll go home.



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For 20 minutes, you might truly appreciate that you can communicate with your parents on an adult, mature, person-to-person level. Then for the entire rest of the time you'll regress back into the brattiest, least appreciative 13-year-old version of yourself, while still feeling guilty that they're paying to take you on vacation and you're acting like a dick. Honestly, once you've lived away from them, being around your parents 24 hours of the day should not even be called a vacation. It is simply a grating, masochistic exercise in actively adding stress to your normally independent life.



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Well this sucks. You thought you'd be wandering around like an adventurous person of the world, meeting interesting new people and fully absorbing the authentic local culture. Instead you're sitting alone at a bar, garnering pity glances from other tourists and intently staring at your guidebook without absorbing any information so you don't look too lonely. Maybe having your parents around wasn't actually so bad.



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If you like spending time with your significant other at home, you'll LOVE spending time with them and only them and nobody else, for days straight, amid constant intense pressure to be having amazing meaningful sex around the clock, until you have zero things left to say to each other and you'll actually start to count down the days until you can go home and poop without running the shower first so they don't hear or smell it! ROMANCE.



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Raising a child at home is already hard enough. It only gets worse when you have to pack up all their stuff (how can such small people require so much equipment?) and force them into a confined space for travel purposes. Also, kids are too dumb to actually appreciate going anywhere. They'll just whine about EVERYTHING. How did your parents put up with this? You should call them to say thank you.