I was accepting applications for tutoring positions. One of the questions on the application asked why being a tutor would be his or her ideal job. I believe the applicant meant to write: "…because I like working with the public." Instead, the applicant wrote:


"…because I like working with the pubic".


I saw this headline for an advertisement for a dresser for sale:


"For sale: Antique dresser for woman with thick legs and large drawers."


The person could have written that sentence so the descriptive modifier isn't separated from its noun.



A restaurant had Kung Pao as one of its dishes on the menu.The ingredients read:


"Chicken nuts, cashews, celery in brown sauce."


° think the restaurant may have left out a comma.


"Prolly"


"he college student may have meant "Probably."


"Per say"

The college student may have meant "Per se."



A sign in a store somewhere in Europe:


"We speak the English as she is goodly spocken."



I remember I was dating a guy who had a sister who was complaining to him about their sister always being late:

"I pacifically told her we would leave at 6:30 sharp."


I'm glad she didn't tell her with aggressiveness.




A local newspaper found these words written on a local organization door entrance:


"TWELVE STEPPING BIG WOMAN GROUP IN BASEMENTUSE DOUBLE-WIDE DOORS AT BOTTOM OF STAIRS AND REMEMBER FIRST STEP IS BROKEN SO IGNORE IT.


Hilarious play on words, don't you think?




One of my colleagues' all-time favorites, from The Houston Post in about 1976, when the Pope was touring the world giving speeches:


"Bomb Thrown Before Pope Speaks"


The article never revealed what the bomb said.



Written by Francesca Barocio, M.S.

www.24-7proofreading.com