Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, the new play from J.K. Rowling and latest addition to the Harry Potter story, takes place nineteen years after the events of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. But what happened to our beloved wand-pointers in the intervening time? Here are a few Harry Potter books we should have seen in between:

 

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This book picks up directly after the final chapter of The Deathly Hallows (ignore the epilogue, just like Rowling should have). The death toll of the Battle of Hogwarts was rather significant, so it takes a while to bury everyone with a proper ceremony. Plus, a traditional wizard funeral can take several days and doesn't end until someone catches the golden snitch and weeps onto it. Most of the tension in this book centers around Harry and Ginny trying to sneak away and finally try sex.

 

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Ever wonder why even the most powerful wizards allow goblins to manage their money? It's because they can't do basic arithmetic. Even muggle-born wizards were plucked from the public school system at age 11, giving them just long enough to learn their multiplication tables. Worse, their currency doesn't even use a base-ten number system (the denominations convert in prime numbers!).

The closest thing Hogwarts seems to offer to a mathematics class is "Arithmancy", an elective involves predicting the future with numbers. You don't need Professor Vector to predict that this sequel is just one long scene of Harry and friends trying to to figure out how to split a check.

 

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Finding out that you are part of a secret society of people who perform magic and never wear pants is enough to traumatize an 11-year-old. Harry's life - growing up in an abusive household, being abducted by a giant on a flying motorcycle, experiencing night terrors, battling his world's version of Hitler, seeing his dead parents, and actually dying himself - is a montage of adorable emotional horror.

In this entry to the series, Harry finally seeks help from someone other than a boarding school headmaster or a wanted criminal who can turn into a dog: a licensed muggle psychologist. Doctor-patient privilege keeps the wizarding world a secret, but can Harry's therapist even begin to heal Harry's battered psyche? It's a good thing he's being paid in large discs of gold.

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A few years after the decimation that was the Second Wizarding War, the United States (at least, the muggle United States) is struck with a tragedy of its own. Hermione, now working for the Ministry of Magic, proposes using her time-turner to go back in time and warn the US Government, violating the International Statute of Wizarding Secrecy. She is overruled with a resounding "nah".

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This never bothered you?